Tag Archives: geoff meggs

Deep Dive into the Vancouver Election Results


I did a quick analysis of the Vancouver election results last night, but this morning I did a deeper dive into the data (Skyrim can wait).

I went through the 135 polling districts and tried to find interesting patterns and changes from 2008 to 2011. Here are some of the highlights:

  • Mayor Gregor Robertson’s best polls were in Commercial Drive, Mount Pleasant, and Fairview Slops – where he beat Anton by over 500 votes in 13 polls. In poll 33 (heart of Commercial Drive), he topped Anton by a whopping 822 votes!
  • Suzanne Anton’s best polls were in Shaughnessy, Kerrisdale, and south-east Vancouver, but the most she was able to beat Gregor by was 386 votes in poll 89.
  • Vision’s new super-star candidate is Andrea Reimer. Last election she had the most votes in only one poll. This time, she overcame the donkey vote to finish first in 28 polls (tied with Raymond Louie).
  • The West-End put Adriane Carr on Council. She had the most votes in 5 polls (1, 2, 5, 6, 8).
  • Despite being one of least popular Vision councillors (at least in terms of votes), Geoff Meggs had the most votes in poll 35 (Olympic Village). Geoff Meggs has taken a keen interest on the Olympic Village, blogging about it frequently, which apparently residents appreciate.
  • What’s going on in West Point Grey (polls 129 and 130)? Last election they voted strongly NPA. This time they voted for Robertson and the top city council candidates were Geoff Meggs (who was barely a factor here in 2008) and maverick NPA candidate Bill McCreery, and Adriane Carr had some of her best results outside of the West End.
  • The biggest swings to Robertson were in polls 37, 132, 104, 32, and 130 – Kitsilano, Mount Pleasant, and Point Grey – where he picked up an extra 202-342 votes.
  • Robertson lost the most support in polls 88, 83, 59, 61, 82, and 89 – heavily Chinese neighbourhoods in south-east and east Vancouver – where Anton gained 223-291 votes.

Continue reading Deep Dive into the Vancouver Election Results

My Endorsed Slate for Vancouver Election

Gregor Robertson
For Mayor, I’ll be voting for Gregor Robertson of Vision Vancouver.

For council, my votes in order of preference:

  1. Andrea Reimer (Vision)cool, environmentalist, leading Greenest City initiative
  2. Geoff Meggs (Vision) – transportation guru, supportive of bike lanes
  3. Heather Deal (Vision) – DSF scientist, lead food cart initiative
  4. RJ Aquino (COPE) – young, hip, engaged
  5. Kerry Jang (Vision) – medical health professor, lead push for homeless shelters
  6. Ellen Woodsworth (COPE) – advocate for affordable housing and social justice
  7. George Affleck (NPA) – former Modo chair and cycling supporter
  8. Raymond Louie (Vison) – smart, articulate
  9. Tony Tang (Vision)he’s the man(g)
  10. Tim Stevenson (Vision) – experienced

My thoughts on other candidates I considered voting for:

  • Sean Bickerton (NPA) – I like him, he’s a smart guy, he’s willing to debate on twitter, just a bit misguided on cycling issues.
  • Tim Louis (COPE) – only COPE candidate I’m not voting for. Not impressed with his combative style.
  • Adriane Carr (Green) – I love the Green party, but very disappointed in Carr – she proposed bike-free streets and had the worst answers at Last Candidate Standing. I don’t think she understands urban issues at all.
  • Sandy Garossino – I like that she is talking about affordable housing, but not sure where she stands on other issues. Plus stopping foreign ownership is borderline xenophobic.
  • Neighbourhoods for Sustainable Vancouver (NSV) – Too much NIMBY-ism. Stopping all housing development will not make Vancouver affordable.

For School Board and Parks Board I’ll be voting for the Vision/COPE slate.

Critical Pedal (Vancouver Cycling Documentary)


A short documentary on cycling in Vancouver. It was only recently published, but the content is already dated – the interviews were conducted before the Olympics, so there is no mention of the separated bike lanes downtown. It is amazing to think how much progress has been made in the past year.