Category Archives: Vegan

Science vs Vegans


One of my favourite podcasts just did an episode on veganism, and its great. Science Vs tackled three questions:

  • Is going vegan better for the environment?
  • Do you need milk for strong bones?
  • If you don’t eat any meat at all, is it bad for you?

Listen here or wherever you get podcasts.

And if you liked that episode, check out:

Note: While the vegan episode shows that the science is firmly behind the diet, the same can’t be said for the other episodes above (sorry keto, detoxes, supplements, and even organic food). You might find your beliefs and lifestyle choices refuted by the science. That’s ok. Listen with an open mind, and challenge your own preconceived notions. Committing yourself to constantly learning and improving is probably the healthiest diet.

Own Grown Life – Personal Vegan Chef

So on a grey, Sunday morning we went to check out Vancouver’s mini Veg Fest – a collection of 23 plant-based vendors in an urban park just off Main Street. We showed up at 11, when it officially started and found lineups 50 people long for most of the vendors that only got longer as we debated what was worth waiting for.

When did Vancouver get so many vegans? Maybe I should have paid attention to the Facebook invite that said 1.1K people were attending and another 4.9K were interested. Yikes! We managed to get some delicious croissants from Yellow Basket Baking and some butchered beans from The Very Good Butchers. I really wanted to try some of the cheeze shops but the lineups were just too crazy.

But who needs fancy vegan cheeses when you have your own personal vegan chef. For the past 3 months we’ve been having homemade, vegan meals cooked in our house by Sarah from Own Grown Life.

Own Grown Life offers a popular lunch program, but for Emily and I lunches are the easiest meal of the day, with plenty of vegan options downtown. Dinner is the real challenge. Daycare pickup with an energetic toddler who’s usually hungry, are not conducive to making nutritious meals from scratch. We were getting by with slow-cooker and Instant Pot meals prepped the night before (and by we, I mean Emily as she was doing 90% of the cooking), but it was exhausting.

Now Sarah comes over once a week to cook us three meals in our own kitchen and we have our evenings free again. On Tuesday evenings there’s a fresh meal waiting on the stove plus two more meals in the fridge that just need to be warmed up. It’s a pretty sweet deal and well worth the cost. We get to work with her on the menu every week and she follows our dietary constraints (vegan, no soy, and at least one nut-free meal every week so we have leftovers we can send to daycare).

Here’s a sampling of some of the meals she’s made us:

    • BBQ Lentil Walnut Burgers
    • Yam and Black Bean Enchiladas
    • Maple & Orange Glazed Tempeh with Bok Choy and Soba Noodles
    • Braised Eggplant with Chickpeas
    • Gazpacho (awesome when it was super hot back in August)
    • Sweet Moroccan Glazed Tempeh with Couscous and Carrot Date Salad
    • Bengali Curry of Cauliflower and Kidney Bean
    • Spiced Indian Barley Stir-fry with chickpeas and spinach

Own Grown Life Meals Own Grown Life Meals Own Grown Life Meals Own Grown Life Meals Own Grown Life Meals Own Grown Life Meals

If you’re looking for a vegan lunch service, or a personal chef who will cook to your dietary needs, I highly recommend checking out Own Grown Life. The convenience is awesome and we all love the food. Astrid gives it a hearty “num num” and “yummy”.

Mexican Misadventure

Sunglasses

Our Mexican misadventure is over and we’re happy to be home. We had beautiful weather, great food, sandy beaches, and spectacular cenotes to explore but it was hard to relax with all the health problems that plagued our trip.

Been Waiting Forever

Our trip got off to a rough start when Emily, Astrid, and I missed our flight to Cancun because Astrid was in the hospital with breathing problems. Luckily she got better and we were able to fly down to join the grandparents a few days later. We contemplated just staying home but we promised our house to guests from Hamilton, and Mairy and Martha were waiting for us in Mexico. When we did arrive, it was great spending time on the beach and relaxing. Astrid had a blast lounging under palm trees and exploring the suite we were staying in.

Cuban Medical Clinic

Two days into our vacation, Astrid took a misstep in a playground and hurt her right leg. It’s the same one she hurt before and we thought she would be back up and running within a day. But two days later she still wouldn’t put any weight on it, so we sought out a doctor and found one at the Centro Medico Cubano (yes, there’s a Cuban medical clinic in Puerto Morelos, Mexico). It cost us 60 pesos ($4) to see a doctor who took a look at Astrid. She didn’t speak any English, but with our limited Spanish and Google Translate we found out her foot was fine but the problem was her hip. The doctor thought it was inflammation caused by Synovitis and told us to give Astrid ibuprofen for 7 days and ensure she didn’t do any walking.

(We saw a pediatrician in Vancouver who thought Astrid’s hip injury was caused by a skeletal muscle injury of some kind and not Synovitis, but he said the treatment would have been the same. And because she was walking within 2 weeks, it likely wasn’t a bone fracture.)

Hammock Nap

Astrid’s hip slowly got better over the last week of our trip, but we still had to deal with some sleepless nights, trouble with naps, and a frustrated toddler who wanted to explore but had to be carried everywhere. To top it off, Emily picked up traveller’s diarrhea on our 2nd last day, ran a high fever of 41 C for 12 hours until she took ibuprofen, and spent the last 48 hours of our trip in bed. Luckily the pharmacy next door to our hotel had the right medication to fix her up before our flight home.

Needless to say, we were all happy to arrive safely home in Vancouver at midnight of New Year’s Eve. We crashed in our beds at 2 am and all of us had a good sleep, even Astrid in her crib.

Group Photo

The trip wasn’t a complete disaster. Astrid had plenty of new experiences, enjoyed eating Mexican food for 2 weeks, and spent lots of time with Grandma and Grammy. We got to go snorkelling, enjoy the warm weather (and avoid the snow in Vancouver), explore Mayan ruins, and swim in beautiful cenotes.

Cabinet Fun

We spent the first week in a 2-bedroom suite in Puerto Morelos, right next to the beach. We had a kitchen where we could make smoothies every morning and cook dinner when we didn’t feel like going out. There were also a few vegan and vegetarian restaurants in town. We really enjoyed Puerto Morelos and would highly recommend it for visitors to the Cancun area. It wasn’t too busy, the beach was a fine powder, and there is great snorkeling right off the coast. The barrier reef is still in good condition, but you can see some bleaching from climate change and pollution, and there is an unsettling amount of plastic washing up on the beach everyday.

Valladolid

The second week took us to Valladolid where we stayed in a vegan bed and breakfast. The town had a sense of colonial history but also everyday Yucatan life. Our highlights were hanging out in the town square, eating at a food court where the eateries competed for your business, and checking out Casa de los Venados. Our b&b was a lush sanctuary in the heart of the city with six dogs to entertain us so we didn’t mind being held up there a few days while Emily slept.

More Guacamole
Astrid would have been happy eating guacamole, bananas, and beans for every meal.

Coba Climb
Archaeologists
We enjoyed exploring the ruins at Ek Balam and Coba. We didn’t make it to Chichen Itza because of Emily’s stomach bug.

Cenote Swim
The cenotes (subterranean pools) were magical. The water was so fresh and clear and a perfect temperature for swimming.

Sunrise
Astrid enjoying the beach sunrise in Puerto Morelos.

Happy Hiker
I was obsessed with getting a photo of Astrid with the Christmas ornament that contains her photo from Christmas last year. This photo will go in a new ornament which will be featured in next year’s photo. It’s so meta.

Cool Dudes
We’re never too sick to be silly.

More pictures.

Vancouver’s New Vegan Quarter

Umaluma Vegan Gelato
Chinatown is home to Vancouver’s newest cluster of vegan restaurants. Located just a 10-minute walk from where we live, it’s made for a tasty summer. Within a block of Main and Keefer there are 4 new plant-based shops that have opened in the past year. Vegan pizza, gelato, and everything else you might want is now conveniently located in the heart of the city.

Kim Jack Il

Virtuous Pie lead the way when it opened its doors last September. Their pizza is amazing, with inventive combinations of toppings. My favourites are Kim-Jack (with kimchi and jackfruit), Stranger Wings (spicy cauliflower wings), and Curry Mile (butter chickpea curry).

The success of Virtuous Pie has lead to a number of other plant-based shops taking root in the neighbourhood this summer.

Vegan Supply Store

The Vegan Supply Store, an established online retailer, opened their first physical location on Pender in July. Their little grocery store is full of all the staples and treats to help anyone on a plant-based diet. Our favourite products so far are the Earth Island VeganEggs (I was skeptical, but they make a tasty scrambled egg alternative) and the huge selection of nut cheeses.


Umaluma Vegan Gelato

Umaluma is just across the street from the Vegan Supply Store, and Vancouver’s first dairy-free gelato shop (although I’m not sure how it differs from plant-based ice cream). They have over 15 flavours! Hazelnet, mojito, drunken cherry, macadamia chocholate – we’ve only tried a few but they’re all excellent.

Kokomo
And finally, Kokomo on Gore. This relaxed little cafe serves up salad bowls (including a tasty kale caesar) and soft-serve Cocowhip. The food was excellent. The Cocowhip was good, but it can’t compete with the gelato a block away.

Merry Christmas 2016

Astrid's 1st Christmas Photo Shoot

Merry Christmas to everyone, from our family to yours. We’re looking forward to spending a quiet Christmas morning with our darling daughter, eating latkes, and opening a few presents. No big showing from Santa here.

Christmas Ornaments

Our family stopped giving presents a few years ago, and I’m grateful for that. Only the kids get something small. The adults in my mother’s extended family do a homemade gift exchange – this year the theme was painting or drawing. Emily and I painted ornaments, and liked them so much we made a few extra for our own tree.

Christmas with Vancouver Family Ukrainian Christmas Eve Dinner

We had our Vancouver family over for a Ukrainian Christmas Eve feast – complete with kutya, borscht, perogies, vegan sour cream, cabbage rolls, beans, mushroom gravy, creamed kale, bread, pickles, and a fruitcake for dessert. Almost all of the food was home-made and vegan (except the perogies which we bought at the farmer’s market and the kutya which has honey), and it all tasted delicious. Ariella even braided a fabulous challah that was glazed with maple syrup and coconut oil. Astrid got to try her first spoonful of borscht and eat some of the sweet potato perogy filling, and I think she liked it.

It wasn’t a purely traditional Ukrainian meal, more of a fusion of cultures to match our family. We started eating at 3:30 instead of waiting for the first star, so the little ones could get to bed. And we lit a menorah to celebrate the start of Hanukkah.

Astrid's 1st Christmas Photo Shoot

Vegan Ice Cream Prize Pack

I won an ice cream prize pack!

All I had to do was take advantage of my daughter’s cuteness and post this picture on Instagram.

Now we have a sweet ice cream scoop and five free pints of vegan ice cream from So Delicious. And the timing couldn’t be better with the heat wave in Vancouver.

Ice Cream Prize Pack from So Delicious

Wayne Easter and Meat Politics

cow

As evidence continues to mount that eating meat and dairy is not only detrimental to the planet but also to human health, politicians in Canada are stubbornly committed to supporting the animal agriculture industry.

Take the recent tweets of Wayne Easter, MP for Malpeque, PEI & member of Liberal Government of Canada, who proudly tweeted about his meeting with cattle lobbyists.

When he was questioned about the environmental and health impacts of animal agriculture, he responded with: “have a T-bone steak. It will make you feel better”.

https://twitter.com/WayneEaster/status/758744760068648960

Which offended many people and as the outrage mounted he tried the “I’m not racist, I have black friends” defence.

Before claiming that it was hard working farmers and their families that were being attacked, which is ridiculous as all of the replies to his tweets were respectful and focussed on public policy.

Unfortunately the questions that Canadians were asking still remain unanswered. I wonder if anyone in the Liberal Government can explain:

  • Why we subsidize animal agriculture when it is increasingly obvious it is not healthy for humans or the planet?
  • Why does the Canada food guide still have sections “Milk and Alternatives” and “Meat and Alternatives”. If it was based on the best science, it would look like the Harvard Healthy Eating Plate, which has a section for “Healthy Protein” and it recommends limiting milk consumption.
  • How will Canada meet its climate change commitments made in Paris (to limit global warming to 1.5 C) without reducing the amount of animal products that Canada produces and consumes?

harvard_healthy_plate